Classics face the hill at Kop

One September weekend each year, the sleepy town of Princes Risborough is host to one of the highest calibre events in the motoring calendar. The legendary Kop Hill climb draws in enthusiasts from the local area and beyond. Following a minor accident in 1925, the event lay dormant until its revival in 2009, whereupon after, the hill climb is no longer a timed race, but participants can still use the rev range accordingly as the road is formally closed for the weekend. Since then, the aim of the occasion is to raise money for various charities. To find out more about their work, visit the website here. Kop Hill is also host to many local businesses, whose trade stands are dotted around the site and provide well-needed sustenance to hungry spectators.


"Following a minor accident in 1925, the event lay dormant until its revival in 2009"

Being a local to the area, Jack has been attending since its revival, but co-producer Will was a total novice. Naturally, due to COVID complications, the hill climb was postponed last year, but the attendance at this year's gathering was not marred, as was made evident in this year's programme. With around 600 entrants, boasting an age range from 1907 to the present day, the climb catered to everyone.


To the passerby, Kop Hill is rather unassuming and a modern car wouldn't break into a sweat, however to the oldtimers that rise to the challenge each year, it proves a worthy adversary and is insurmountable to some of the entrants. While it doesn't boast the twists and turns of Prescott, the climb isn't to be tackled in a poorly Land Rover as Jack has found out in the past...

 

This Berliet/Curtiss Racing was the oldest car at the event, dating to 1907. For context, this Edwardian beast is as old as Brooklands race circuit and the Isle of Man TT race.

 

Despite being a local show, the array of exhibits weren't limited to crusty Cortinas and saggy Stags. It was host to myriad rare and wonderful cars and bikes, some of which we'd never even heard of, including the last surviving Cubitt, built in nearby Aylesbury. It was also a great opportunity to test out our automotive photography capabilities, some of which feature below:

 

This Indian Hedstrom was the oldest motorcycle entrant, dating to 1913!

 
"With around 600 entrants, boasting an age range from 1907 to the present day, the climb catered to everyone."
 

The Bugatti Type 51, another local car, was a particular favourite of ours, especially down to its beautiful original condition

 

A Frazer Nash Super Sports makes its way to the start line

 

Like all motoring gatherings, the opportunity to meet new people is second to none. We were lucky enough to meet our from-the-beginning supporters, Petrolheads Welcome. Jack was fortunate enough to blag a ride in Andrew's gorgeous DB6, which you can watch here, and Paul was more than obliging to let us sit in his 4 1/2 litre Bentley.

 

Like all of the car shows we've attended this year, it's great to meet with other enthusiasts and like-minded petrolheads. We can't wait to go back next year, so make sure to find us and pick up a badge!


-TW Team












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